What Is a Low-Residue Diet?

What Is a Low-Residue Diet?

Man with groceries
A low-residue dietA low-fiber/low-residue diet is a diet with the end goal of having fewer and smaller bowel movements each day and it may help calm symptoms of gastrointestinal illnesses or help prepare the body for certain medical procedures. People who follow a low-residue diet need to eat low-fiber foods that are easy to digest. If your physician tells you to go on a low-residue diet, ask for guidelines around what to eat and how long to stay on the diet.

What Is Food Residue?

The digestive system breaks down and uses most parts of the food we eat. However, there are some substances that can’t be digested. Anything that can’t be broken down and is left over in the large intestine after a meal is digested is called “residue.”

Residue is mostly made up of fiber. Dietary fiber is a substance made by plants. It is primarily present in plant-based foods like grains and produce. The body can’t break down fiber.

Most people need to eat a lot of fiber in order to maintain good health. Eating more fiber reduces a person’s risk of chronic disorders like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends a daily fiber intake of 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men. However, a person may occasionally need to eat smaller amounts of fiber for health reasons.

The Low-Residue Diet

The goal of a low-residue diet is to eat foods that can be easily broken down by the body and will lead to less residue left over in the digestive system. This diet typically causes people to have smaller, less frequent bowel movements.

A low-residue diet is very similar to a low-fiber diet, but they may not be exactly the same. Low-residue diets do focus on low-fiber foods, but they may also eliminate other types of foods as well. For example, dairy products do not contain much fiber, but still lead to a lot of residue, so these foods may also be avoided. This is important to note if you are following a low-residue diet for the purposes of bowel preparation, dietary or other health reasons.

When Do You Need To Use a Low-Residue Diet?

holding belly
There are two main reasons why physicians recommend low-residue diets. The first is for diagnostic purposes, to prepare the digestive system before undergoing a test or surgery. The other is as a treatment for different digestive illnesses. Don’t begin a low-residue diet unless your healthcare provider tells you that you should. Low-residue diets typically don’t provide enough nutrients to keep you healthy long-term, so follow your physician’s instructions regarding when to begin and end this eating plan. Additionally, you may want to ask your physician if it’s a good idea to take any vitamins or supplements while you are following the low-residue diet.

The Low-Residue Diet as Bowel Preparation

Some people need to follow a low-residue diet before going through medical procedures. One such procedure is a colonoscopy. During this test, a physician uses a thin tube with a camera on the end to look inside the large intestine. Colonoscopies are used to diagnose certain illnesses and digestive problems. Colonoscopies are also an important part of screening for colon cancer. People with an average risk of developing this cancer should begin getting screened at the age of 45. Before a colonoscopy, a person needs to clean out their bowel. Traditionally, many physicians recommended a bowel prep that involved taking laxatives and consuming only clear liquids for one or more days before the procedure. However, in recent years many researchers have conducted clinical trials looking at other bowel prep methods. Several studies have found that people who ate a low-residue diet before undergoing procedures had equal or better colon cleansing compared to people who followed a clear liquid diet. Additionally, people following a low-residue diet preferred this method and were more likely to stick to the instructions. Physicians may also recommend following a low-residue diet before other intestinal tests. By eliminating leftover residue from the large intestine, this diet can help the physicians see the intestine more clearly and more accurately identify any problems.

Using the Low-Residue Diet as Treatment

Eating low-residue foods may help manage symptoms of conditions that affect the digestive system. Physicians may recommend following this eating plan to people who are dealing with:

  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Diverticulitis
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • A bowel obstruction (a condition in which digested food is blocking the intestines)
  • Other conditions, such as infection or cancer of the digestive system
  • Surgery of the intestines

There are two different disorders that fall under the umbrella of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. In both of these conditions, there is ongoing inflammation in the small or large intestine. Over time, this inflammation causes damage and leads to symptoms like abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, blood in the stool, weight loss, and tiredness. However, these symptoms don’t occur all of the time. They occur or get worse during disease “flares.” Low-residue diets may help reduce the amount of stool, allowing the intestines rest and leading to fewer IBD symptoms during these flares. Diverticulitis is a condition in which small bulges or pouches form in the intestines, and then — these outpouchings — become inflamed. One study has found that eating foods that are easier on the digestive system, including low-fiber foods, may help reduce symptoms. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder without a clear cause that leads to several digestive symptoms, including bloating, cramping, constipation, and diarrhea. In the past, most physicians have recommended that people with IBS try eating more fiber. Unfortunately, this can sometimes make symptoms more severe. Now, researchers are finding that a low-fiber diet can lessen symptoms or make them disappear altogether. A low-residue or low-fiber diet may also be necessary before surgery — either surgery on the intestines or gynecological surgery. Following a low-residue diet before these surgeries can help create more room in the abdomen and reduce risk of infection. Additionally, switching to a low-residue diet after intestinal surgery can help people’s intestines begin working again more quickly, leading to a shorter amount of time spent in the hospital.

How Does a Low-Residue Diet Work?

Doctor
It is hard to measure exactly how much residue each type of food produces. Additionally, each person’s body may respond to foods differently. Researchers have not always been able to come up with a clear definition for which foods qualify as “low-residue.” For this reason, some physicians now recommend that people who need to follow a low-residue diet simply try to follow a low-fiber diet. When it comes to a low-fiber diet, physicians often suggest eating 10 grams of fiber or less per day. If your physician wants you to follow a low-residue diet, they may also tell you to avoid other foods that may be hard to digest or cause digestive symptoms. Learning about which foods naturally contain fiber can help. Check the nutrition facts label on your foods. This will tell you how much of that food makes up one serving and how much fiber is in each serving. If a food item like a fruit or vegetable doesn’t come with a label, you can look up the amount of fiber per serving online. Keep track of how much fiber you’re eating throughout the day, and try not to eat more than 10 grams, or follow your physician’s instructions for how much fiber you should be eating. Your physician will tell you how long to remain on a low-residue diet. If you just need to go through bowel prep for an upcoming procedure, you may only need to follow the diet for one or a couple of days. If you are trying to use a low-residue diet to help with disease symptoms, your physician may advise staying on the diet for several weeks or months. People who need to follow a low-residue diet long-term may want to consult with a Registered Dietician (RD) or Certified Nutrition Specialist (CNS). These health professionals can help ensure that you are eating balanced meals and getting good nutrition while limiting the foods that you eat.

What Foods Can I Eat on a Low-Residue Diet?

During a low-residue diet, you’ll want to focus on low-fiber foods. This list of foods provides a good starting point for what you may be able to eat. However, each person digests food differently, so your physician may tell you to avoid foods that are on this list. Always follow your physician’s recommendations. Usually, the foods on this list have low levels of fiber. However, it is still important to check the nutrition facts label for everything that you eat. Some naturally low-fiber foods have extra fiber added in. When it comes to grains, white or refined products have less fiber than whole-wheat and whole-grain products. Stick to:

  • White bread
  • White pasta
  • White rice
  • Non-whole-wheat crackers
  • Cereal without added fiber.

Most cooked, tenderized meats are okay to have on a low-residue diet. You can also have poultry and eggs. For plant-based options, you can try tofu and smooth peanut butter. Most fruits and vegetables should not be eaten raw. Cooking produce, removing skins and seeds, and avoiding pulp helps you cut back on fiber and residue. Vegetables that can be eaten raw include small amounts of zucchini, cucumbers, or lettuce. Make sure to peel and remove seeds first. You can also have cooked, canned, or juiced versions of the following vegetables:

  • Spinach
  • Green beans and wax beans
  • Asparagus
  • Eggplant
  • Squash and pumpkin
  • Potatoes with the skins removed
  • Carrots
  • Beets

When it comes to fruits, juices are always a good option — but make sure to buy pulp-free! Sauces and purees like applesauce are also good bets. Raw melon, cantaloupe, bananas, apricots, nectarines, peaches, and plums are usually okay to have on a low-residue diet. If you’re eating raw fruit, make sure it’s very ripe. You can also have canned fruits as long as they don’t come in heavy syrup. Make sure to drink plenty of fluids while on a low-residue diet. This can help prevent constipation, which is common when eating low-fiber foods.

What Foods Should I Avoid on a Low-Residue Diet?

Avoid whole-grain and whole-wheat foods, which contain a lot of fiber. Additionally, stay away from:

  • Brown rice and wild rice
  • Popcorn
  • Oats and oatmeal
  • Granola
  • Wheat germ
  • Bran
  • Grains like barley, quinoa, and bulgur

When it comes to meats, stay away from processed meats like hot dogs and sausage, and say no to any deli meats. You should also avoid nuts and crunchy peanut butter, beans, and tempeh, as these are all high-fiber foods. Avoid any vegetables that aren’t on the above lists. Additionally, stay away from any vegetables that haven’t been de-seeded or peeled. When it comes to fruit, you should avoid all dried fruits, as these typically contain a lot of fiber. You should also choose not to eat any pineapple, berries, figs, and prunes. Ask your physician whether it is okay to eat dairy products. Some low-residue diet recommendations include limiting or avoiding milk, yogurt, and cheese. These products contain low amounts of fiber but may worsen digestive symptoms and increase the amount of stool that you produce.

How To Reintroduce High-Fiber Foods

produce
You’ve completed the low-residue diet, and your physician says that you no longer need to follow this eating plan. Now what?

If you have only been eating low-fiber foods for a day or two, it may be fine to eat a normal amount of fiber again the next day. Ask your physician for recommendations.

If you have been following a low-residue diet for a longer time period, don’t go back to your usual diet immediately. It will be difficult for your digestive system to handle. Instead, increase the amount of fiber you eat gradually over time. Try eating a small amount of a high-fiber food for a couple of days in a row. If you don’t experience any symptoms, add this food back into your diet.

Some experts recommend adding 5 more grams of fiber to your diet each week. For example, if you have been eating 10 grams of fiber each day, try eating 15 grams of fiber per day the following week, and 20 grams per day the week after that. If you begin to experience digestive symptoms like bloating, cramping, or diarrhea, try decreasing your fiber intake again until the symptoms resolve.

Conclusions

A low-residue diet is similar to a low-fiber diet. In some cases, they may be the same. These diets may be a necessary tool when preparing for certain medical procedures. They can also be a helpful way of managing symptoms for people with digestive diseases. However, people should not usually stay on low-residue diets for long time periods, because fiber helps keep you healthy and prevent chronic illnesses. Follow your physician’s instructions when it comes to beginning and ending a low-residue diet, and heed their recommendations about what to eat and avoid. If you think this is a diet that could benefit you, please discuss with Dr. Connor first by making an appointment.

The Best Anti-Aging Superfoods

The Best Anti-Aging Superfoods

woman with pomegranate
Staying young isn’t just about the way you look or the way you act — it’s also about protecting your health. The older we get, the more damage builds up in our tissues and the more likely we are to be diagnosed with chronic health conditions.

Of course, there’s no way to permanently halt the aging process. However, eating right and taking care of yourself can help minimize age-related damage and keep you feeling as good as you can throughout many decades of life.

(I encourage you to read my entire series on superfoods to learn about what is so super about superfoods as well as about superfoods for weight lossheart healthdiabetes and pre-diabetesradiant skin and gut health.)

Aging and Your Health

Every part of your body goes through age-related changes. Your skin loses its elasticity, your muscles become weaker, and your bones lose strength.

Additionally, the older you get, the higher your risk for health conditions such as:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Arthritis and other joint problems
  • Cognitive disorders like dementia and Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cancer

Adopting healthy habits, including eating more nutritious foods, may help slow down these changes and keep you as healthy as possible as you age.

What Causes Aging?

Experts are still learning about the many factors that bring about aging. However, they have identified a few possible causes, which may be affected by lifestyle habits such as diet.

Some genes help control aging. These genes may be turned on or off or develop mutations that lead to age-related changes within cells.

Aging is also linked to damage. Small molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS) can form within cells. ROS damage DNA and cells, causing a cell to age. On the other hand, antioxidants are substances that get rid of ROS, helping prevent and heal damage. Some unhealthy foods can lead to higher levels of ROS, while other foods can act as antioxidants, keeping your cells young.

Inflammation is another factor that leads to aging. A little bit of inflammation is necessary to help the immune system fight off germs or toxins. But chronic (ongoing) inflammation can accelerate the aging process and lead to age-related health problems. Different foods can help raise or lower the amount of inflammation in the body.

Superfood Solutions to Stop Aging

super foods
Eating a variety of foods from each food group is enough to help you get most of the vitamins and minerals you need to stay healthy. However, if you’re worried about aging, you may want to eat extra superfoods that can help your cells stay healthy.

There’s no one definition of a “superfood,” but the label tends to be given to foods or drinks that offer higher levels of health-boosting nutrients. Superfoods also frequently contain helpful molecules like antioxidants, which protect cells from free radicals and help heal the damage that builds up with age. Additionally, many superfoods have been shown to help reduce the risk of developing different chronic diseases.

Adding more of these foods to your diet may help you keep your body healthy and make you look and feel as young as possible as you age!

Blueberries

Blueberries are a powerful superfood that can help keep you healthy into your later years. These fruits contain antioxidants and other anti-aging molecules.

Blueberries can protect nerve cells from ROS and inflammation. This can help prevent or even reverse age-related problems with memory, cognitive abilities, balance, and motor function.

Blueberries also contain molecules called anthocyanins that help protect against disorders like diabetes and heart disease. They may even help protect against early death.

Nuts

Different kinds of nuts — including almonds, walnuts, pistachios, Brazil nuts, and pine nuts — provide healthy fats and protein and help protect against inflammation. Another big benefit of eating nuts is their ability to help prevent age-related health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and cognitive problems like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Nuts may even help you live longer. One study found:

  • People who ate nuts once per week were 89% less likely to have an early death.
  • Those who ate nuts two to four times a week were 87% less likely to die early.
  • Eating nuts five or six times per week led to an 85% reduced risk of early death.
  • People who had nuts at least seven times a week were 80% less likely to die early.

Pomegranates

Pomegranates are a fantastic superfood that contain several anti-aging molecules.

Several substances found in pomegranates can help protect cartilage from being degraded. This may help keep joints healthy and protect against arthritis.

These fruits also contain molecules called ellagitannin and ellagic acid. When you eat pomegranate, the good bacteria in your gut transform these chemicals into urolithin A (UA). UA reduces inflammation and gives a boost to the mitochondria (small structures that make energy for your cells).

UA can also protect against age-related problems that appear in your muscles, joints, brain, and other tissues. In some laboratory studies, UA also helped animals live longer, although this has not yet been tested in humans.

Tomatoes

Eating more tomatoes may be an easy way to keep your skin healthy as you age. Tomatoes contain lycopene, a red pigment that also acts as an antioxidant. Pro tip: your body can absorb lycopene from tomato paste more easily than it can from fresh tomatoes.

Researchers have found that lycopene is present in your skin cells and in the oil that your skin produces, although levels decrease with age. Fortunately, eating more lycopene can increase how much of this molecule is present in your skin, bringing lycopene levels up to those seen in young adults. Studies have also found that eating more tomato paste protects the skin from sun damage.

Tomatoes may provide other benefits as well. Some research shows that eating more tomatoes can help reduce your chances of being diagnosed with serious conditions like heart disease and cancer.

Salmon

Salmon, as well as other fatty fish like trout, mackerel, sardines, and tuna, is a great source of vitamin D, protein, and healthy fats, making it an important superfood.

Levels of vitamin D in the body tend to drop with age. This is bad news for your bones, since vitamin D is needed to keep them strong and healthy. Low vitamin D levels mean an increased risk of weak or broken bones. Not getting enough of this vitamin also puts you at risk for certain age-linked diseases like high blood pressure, diabetes, depression, and cancer. Making sure you have enough of this vitamin as you age is essential.

Healthy protein sources also become increasingly important as you age. The older you get, the more muscle mass you lose. Eating higher levels of protein can help combat this and keep the muscles healthy.

The omega-3 fats found in salmon and other fish also help with healthy aging. They can reduce inflammation and protect brain health, helping prevent age-related declines in thinking and memory abilities.

Nonfat Milk

Milk and dairy products such as cheese and yogurt provide several important nutrients. Like fatty fish, milk is a good source of protein. In the United States, milk is also usually fortified with extra vitamin D, making it another good source of this vitamin.

Dairy foods also contain a lot of calcium, a mineral that is important for bone health. Low calcium levels can eventually lead to osteoporosis, a disease in which the bones become weak. Older adults may also be at risk for this condition because some medications may prevent the body from absorbing as much calcium as it normally would. Getting enough calcium from your diet is important at every age and can help prevent future bone problems.

Whole Grains

People who want to age well should look to whole grains. Try switching out white bread for whole wheat bread, refined pasta for wheat pasta, and white rice for brown rice. You can also eat more grains like quinoa, oats, or popcorn.

Research shows that middle-aged adults who eat more whole grains are more likely to have better physical and mental health, and are less likely to have chronic illnesses.

Turmeric

Turmeric is the super spice that gives Indian curries their yellow color. Turmeric contains a molecule called curcumin that can help improve many aspects of health and has some anti-aging properties.

Laboratory studies have found that curcumin can help worms, flies, and mice live longer. It’s not yet clear whether turmeric can affect lifespan in humans, but researchers have identified several ways in which this spice can affect aging.

Curcumin can boost the body’s own natural antioxidants. It can also turn off several genes linked to aging. Finally, it can lessen symptoms of certain health conditions linked to aging and inflammation, such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

Water

While it may not be a “superfood” in the usual sense, water is an important nutrient that is vital for aging well. Your skin loses moisture as you get older, which makes it age. Staying hydrated is important for keeping all of your tissues healthy.

Your sense of thirst may also decrease as you get older, making it harder to remember to drink enough fluids. Additionally, staying hydrated is important when taking certain medications for chronic health conditions.

Make a plan to drink a certain number of glasses of water each day. Plan when you’re going to have drinks — don’t wait until you feel thirsty. Try having a full glass of water with every meal, and while taking any medication. If drinking enough water is difficult, you can also drink some low-fat or nonfat milk, or juice without added sugar or salt.

Diet Plans for Healthy Aging

woman with a salad and tape measure

While eating superfoods can help protect against illness, following a healthy eating plan may provide even better results. Researchers have developed certain diets that reduce a person’s chances of developing conditions that may come on with age.

One of the best-studied diets is the Mediterranean diet. It emphasizes plant-based meals with lots of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, olive oil, and seafood. This diet can lower the risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and certain types of cancer. In one study, people who followed the Mediterranean diet more closely were 26% less likely to have an early death from heart problems.

A related diet, called Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), helps lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels and boost heart health.

The Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet combines elements from both eating plans above. The MIND diet encourages people to eat leafy green vegetables, berries, whole grains, nuts, beans, and wine. It can help protect against Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Other Tips for Aging Well

Many different lifestyle factors affect how we age. If you want to maintain health into your later years, you may also want to consider making other changes.

Getting Enough Physical Activity As You Age

Nearly one in three adults over the age of 50 are physically inactive. Additionally, people with chronic health conditions are more likely to report that they don’t get as much exercise. However, physical activity is very important — it can help prevent or treat many different disorders and reduce a person’s chances of an early death.

Experts make the following physical activity recommendations for older adults:

  • Get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each week (for example, take five 30-minute brisk walks per week)
  • Spend two days each week doing strength training or other activities that help build muscle
  • Regularly perform exercises that help improve balance, such as standing on one foot

If you can’t reach all of the above goals, remember that doing something is better than nothing. The more time you spend moving and the less time you spend sitting, the better! Make sure to talk to your doctor before starting a new exercise plan to make sure that you are being active in a way that is healthy for you.

Limiting Alcohol and Tobacco

Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol can speed up the aging process. They can both negatively impact the skin and lead to more wrinkles. Alcohol and tobacco can also increase a person’s chances of being diagnosed with cancer and other serious conditions.

One study also found that people who didn’t drink heavily or smoke, and adopted other healthy habits like eating healthy and getting exercise, were 60% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Maintaining Mental Health

People of all ages can struggle with maintaining good mental health. However, problems like depression or anxiety can have a bigger impact on physical health for older adults. Poor mental health can make it harder for people to seek treatment for other conditions like diabetes or heart disease.

If you notice changes in your mood or emotions, talk to your doctor. Therapy or medication often helps improve your mental health, which can in turn have a positive impact on your physical health.

Conclusion

Your diet increasingly impacts your health as you age. The more you add superfoods and other nutritious foods to your diet, the more you can protect your skin and other organs from age-related damage and decrease your risk of chronic health disorders. Please click here to schedule an appointment with Dr Connor or call us at (512) 382-9500.

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Causes and Treatments

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Causes and Treatments

Testing blook sugar

Diabetes — a condition that affects more than one in 10 Americans — often leads to additional health problems called complications. One of the most common diabetes complications is peripheral neuropathy. People with this condition have nerve damage that leads to pain, tingling, numbness, or weakness in the hands and feet. About one in two people with diabetes have peripheral neuropathy.

What Causes Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a disease of the nerves. The body uses nerves to communicate with the rest of the body. Some nerves send signals from the brain to other tissues, and then other nerves send signals back to the brain. This process helps the brain learn about feelings and sensations, tell muscles when and how to move, and control different processes in the body such as breathing and the heartbeat.

In people with diabetes, the body has a hard time controlling levels of sugar and fat in the blood. High blood sugar levels and high fat levels can directly damage the nerves and also harm the blood vessels that keep the nerves healthy. In people with neuropathy, the brain has a harder time receiving information from and sending signals to certain parts of the body.

Neuropathy can also be caused by other conditions. Certain genetic disorders that are passed down within families can lead to nerve damage. Other disorders such as Guillain-Barre syndrome, inflammatory conditions, or cancer may also lead to neuropathy. Environmental or lifestyle-related causes of neuropathy can include heavy drinking, not getting enough of certain vitamins or minerals, exposure to toxic substances, or infections.

Types of Neuropathy

Damage to different types of nerves can lead to different forms of neuropathy. These include:

  • Peripheral neuropathy: damage to the nerves in the feet or hands
  • Autonomic neuropathy: damage to the nerves that control body functions like digestion, blood pressure, sweating, vision, urination, and body temperature
  • Focal neuropathies: problems with a single nerve in the wrist, leg, head, or other location; includes carpal tunnel syndrome and eye problems
  • Proximal neuropathy: damage that affects nerves in the thigh, hip, or buttock, usually just on one side of the body

People with diabetes can develop any of these neuropathies. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common type of nerve damage.

Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms

man holding arm
Peripheral neuropathy symptoms affect the feet, ankles, lower legs, hands, or arms. People with this condition may feel pain, burning, weakness, numbness, or “pins and needles” sensations. The sense of touch may also be affected in these areas. For example, people with peripheral neuropathy may not notice right away when their hand is touching something hot, or they may not realize that their shoes are too tight.

These symptoms can develop and worsen slowly over time, or they can appear quickly. They may be more severe at night than they are during the day.

Long-Term Effects of Peripheral Neuropathy

Over time, people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy may experience worsening problems with their feet. When it is harder for the nerves in the feet to pick up on different sensations, a person may be less likely to notice pain or discomfort. Some people with diabetes develop sores, blisters, or infections on their feet, and may not notice these issues right away.

Diabetes interferes with the body’s healing processes by preventing enough blood from flowing to injured tissues. This means that it is harder for the body to repair even minor injuries. Some people with diabetes who develop severe foot problems may need to have a toe or foot amputated.

When feet and leg problems pile up, it may become harder to walk. Some of those with neuropathy may have a hard time balancing properly. This can lead to falls, which puts a person at risk for breaking bones. A person’s sense of movement may also be affected. Peripheral neuropathy may also cause a lot of pain, especially while walking.

Diabetics with peripheral neuropathy are likely to need more frequent visits to their doctor’s office or the hospital. They may also have a hard time working because of pain or difficulties getting around. All of these issues can in turn lead to mental health disorders such as anxiety or depression.

Diagnosing Peripheral Neuropathy

woman holding lower back
If you are experiencing signs of peripheral neuropathy, talk to your doctor. You will likely need to have a physical exam. Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and your family and personal health history.

Blood tests are often a part of physical exams. These tests can identify various health problems that can cause neuropathy or be found in people with diabetes. Blood tests may be used to detect:

  • Abnormal blood cell levels
  • Thyroid disorders
  • Kidney or liver problems
  • Low levels of certain vitamins or minerals

During the physical exam, your doctor may perform several tests to see whether you are able to detect sensations with the nerves in your feet. One possible test is a monofilament test, in which the doctor touches your feet with a thin strand of nylon to see if you can feel it. Another test involves touching the feet with a tuning fork to see if the nerves in your feet can sense vibrations.

Doctors can directly measure how well your nerves and muscles are working with other tests. They may use nerve conduction velocity tests (NCV) to see how fast your nerves are able to send out signals. An electromyogram (EMG) measures electricity in the muscles, which helps doctors understand how fast your muscles respond to signals from the nerves.

Other tests may include checking your balance, seeing how well you walk, or testing the blood flow in your feet and toes.

Can Peripheral Neuropathy Be Prevented?

pricking finger

One of the most important ways people can reduce their risk of neuropathy is by treating their diabetes. Keeping blood sugar levels under control helps prevent the nerves from becoming damaged. Work with your doctor to develop a diabetes treatment plan that works for you.

Certain risk factors can increase a person’s chances of developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy. These include:

  • Being older
  • Having diabetes for a long period of time
  • Having certain genes
  • Smoking cigarettes
  • Heavy drinking
  • Being overweight
  • Having other health problems such as high cholesterol levels or hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Being diagnosed with other conditions, including kidney disease

You can’t control some peripheral neuropathy risk factors like age or genetics. However, you can reduce your risk of nerve damage by focusing on certain lifestyle changes. Getting more exercise, eating a balanced diet (especially superfoods for diabetics), quitting smoking, and limiting how much you drink may help you avoid peripheral neuropathy. Additionally, use lifestyle changes or medication to prevent or treat high blood pressure or cholesterol levels.

Peripheral Neuropathy Treatments

If you are suffering from neuropathy pain, the first step is talking to your doctor, who can help you come up with a treatment plan. Make sure to ask about ways to both treat the neuropathy as well as keep your diabetes under control to prevent further damage.

Medications for Peripheral Neuropathy

Several different types of drugs can help manage peripheral neuropathy pain. However, traditional painkillers may not always be the best option. In particular, over-the-counter pain medications often do not work for neuropathic pain. These include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen as well as other drugs like acetaminophen.

Instead of utilizing traditional pain relievers, physicians sometimes recommend a medication for nerve pain that is in the “antidepressant” category of medicine because of the mechanism of action of this medication. These medications don’t heal nerve damage, but they can reduce neuropathy symptoms. Possible options may include:

  • Pamelor (nortriptyline)
  • Norpramin (desipramine)
  • Tofranil (imipramine)
  • Elavil (amitriptyline)
  • Cymbalta (duloxetine)
  • Effexor (venlafaxine)
  • Paxil (paroxetine)
  • Celexa (citalopram)

Anti-seizure medications may be another option for treating peripheral neuropathy pain. These drugs may include Neurontin (gabapentin) or Lyrica (pregabalin). Finally, topical medications that are applied directly to the skin may help. Your doctor may be able to prescribe a cream, spray, or patch that can numb pain.

These medications are not always equally effective for everyone. If you try one medication and it doesn’t seem to be helping, notify your doctor — another drug may work better for you.

When blood sugar levels rise, some of these medications may not work as well to treat neuropathy symptoms. Following your diabetes treatment plan is important when trying to treat nerve pain and treating the root cause of the problem is the goal in working to reduce neuropathy and neuropathic pain.

Supplements for Neuropathy

Several studies have found that alpha-lipoic acid can work well to treat neuropathy symptoms. This molecule is an antioxidant that is made by the body. Alpha-lipoic acid treatments are especially effective when they are given intravenously, through an IV needle that goes directly into a vein.

This antioxidant is also available as an over-the-counter supplement. In this form, alpha-lipoic acid may still help with symptoms, but it is not usually as effective as IV treatments.

Physical Therapy

People with diabetic neuropathy may want to consider going to physical therapy (PT). This type of treatment can help you build strength and improve your balance. During PT, you will work with a physical therapist to perform different exercises that specifically address your needs.

Caring For Your Feet

feet

Taking good care of your feet can help prevent minor problems from getting worse. Doctors recommend that people with peripheral neuropathy check their feet every day. If you notice a small issue right away and seek treatment, you have a better chance of healing and avoiding infection. Try looking for:

  • Cuts, sores, or areas where the skin is broken
  • Blisters
  • Calluses (areas of thicker skin)
  • Plantar warts (a hard, rough growth on the surface of the skin)
  • Rashes such as athlete’s foot
  • Ingrown toenails (a condition in which the edge of a toenail grows into the flesh, or the surrounding skin starts growing over the nail)

Try to get into the habit of washing your feet each day. Make sure the water that you use isn’t too hot. If you have a hard time sensing temperature, use a thermometer to measure the water before washing. Don’t use water above 95 degrees Fahrenheit (35 degrees Celsius). Once you are done, dry your feet thoroughly. Dust your feet with baby powder or cornstarch to help keep your skin dry.

Another way to protect your feet is always wearing socks and shoes. Socks can help keep your feet dry, while shoes protect your feet from injury. Make sure your shoes aren’t too tight, and break in new shoes by wearing them for short periods of time when you first get them. Before putting on your shoes, check that there are no small stones or other objects inside that could hurt your feet.

Certain types of footwear can also help prevent ulcers. Ask your doctor about whether insoles, shoes, or orthotics may help support your feet.

yearly foot exam is also a good idea for people with peripheral neuropathy. During this visit, your doctor can make sure your feet are in good health. More frequent exams may be needed for people who have current or past foot problems. You may be able to go to your primary care provider for this exam, or your doctor may recommend that you see a podiatrist (a doctor who specializes in treating feet).

Controlling Diabetes

Managing your blood sugar levels is a very important part of treating and controlling nerve damage. Make sure to check your blood sugar regularly. Choose nutritious foods that won’t lead to large blood sugar spikes, and get regular physical activity. Additionally, use any medications as directed by your doctor.

If you don’t think that you are controlling your blood sugar levels well enough, talk to your health care team. Your doctor may be able to help you better understand which treatments or lifestyle changes will help prevent complications from diabetes. A certified nutritionist or registered dietician can also help you come up with a better eating plan.

Conclusion

It is important to take peripheral neuropathy seriously, since symptoms can get worse and may cause additional problems over time. Effectively treating your diabetes can help you avoid nerve damage or prevent existing symptoms from worsening. Medications can help relieve symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, including pain. Follow the directions of your health care team when it comes to making necessary lifestyle changes and taking care of your feet. If you are having nerve pain and would like to discuss it further, please make an appointment. 

Superfoods Part 6: Foods That Promote Gut Health

Superfoods Part 6: Foods That Promote Gut Health

woman with bag of groceries
This is the final installment of my first six-part series on superfoods, this time focussing on foods that promote gut health. I welcome you to read the other articles in the series, “What Is a Superfood and What Is So Super About Them?”, “Supercharge Your Diet with Superfoods for Weight Loss”, “Critical Superfoods for a Healthy Heart”, “Essential Superfoods for Diabetics and Pre-Diabetics”, and “Ten Essential Superfoods for Radiant Skin”.

The foods you feed your body play a big role in how well your body works and how healthy and well you feel. Some foods offer very little nutritional value, as you might have heard of “empty calories” while others contain high levels of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that boost health and help you tremendously . Eating these superfoods can play an important role in keeping your gut functioning at its best.

Your Digestive System

Your digestive system, also called your gastrointestinal system, or your gut, is important for turning food into fuel and helps keep you healthy. When you eat, food travels from your mouth, through your esophagus, to your stomach. From the stomach, food passes through your small intestine, large intestine or colon, and rectum, and passes out of your body through the anus when you go to the bathroom. Together, these organs form a tube stretching through your body that is about 30 feet long! Other organs, such as the gallbladder, liver, and pancreas also help with digestion by producing enzymes that break down food.

The primary role of the digestive system is breaking down proteins, carbohydrates, and fats into smaller pieces that the body’s cells can more easily absorb. However, the gut also performs several other jobs as well:

  • Absorbing vitamins and minerals
  • Soaking up water
  • Eliminating waste
  • Helping the immune system get rid of harmful germs
  • Communicating with the brain to control digestion, appetite, and emotions

Gut Bacteria

Another very important part of the digestive system is bacteria. Some bacteria, such as E. coli or Salmonella, can make you sick if you eat foods that are contaminated with them. However, other “good bacteria” live in our intestines and are very important for keeping us healthy. Their roles include:

  • Helping the body digest food
  • Crowding out more harmful bacteria
  • Keeping harmful substances from getting into the bloodstream
  • Helping form a barrier on the cells of the intestine
  • Boosting the immune system
  • Creating new vitamins that our bodies can use
  • Helping control appetite and how our body uses fat
  • Communicating with the brain in order to control moods and emotions
  • Helping the body fix damaged cells

The gut bacteria may also play a role in all sorts of different diseases, including cancer and asthma. Adopting habits that help gut bacteria thrive can help our bodies work properly and make us feel healthy.

Keeping Your Gut Healthy

belly
Many different lifestyle habits, including the foods we regularly eat, have a big impact on how our digestive systems and gut bacteria function. The choices we make can help make our health better or worse. Certain eating habits can optimize our guts. Eating smaller meals can make it easier for our bodies to digest foods. Eating more slowly and chewing food for longer amounts of time before swallowing can also break down food more efficiently and helps us swallow less air. Additionally, creating an eating schedule and having meals at the same times each day may help our guts work better. Other measures to keep your gut working at its best include:

  • Exercising: Getting a lot of physical activity helps the muscles in the digestive system move properly, encourages the growth of more healthy bacteria, and causes lower levels of inflammation in the gut.
  • Sleep: When you get regular sleep on a consistent schedule, your gut gets time to rest and reset. Lack of sleep can cause digestive system inflammation. People who don’t get good quality sleep are also more likely to have gastrointestinal diseases.
  • Lowering stress: High stress levels can make the cells in the intestines more “leaky,” leading more harmful substances to be absorbed into the bloodstream. Some people may often get constipation, diarrhea, or other symptoms of gut diseases during times of stress, because the digestive system isn’t working at its best. See my article, “How Stress Affects the Gut and What You Can Do About It” for more.

One of the biggest factors in how your digestive system and your gut bacteria function is the foods that you eat. Proper nutrition keeps you at your healthiest. This is where superfoods come in. Eating foods that are easily broken down by your gut, that keep the cells of your digestive system working properly, and that keep your gut bacteria healthy can help you get the most nutrition out of your food and prevent disease.

Digestive Disorders

When the organs of the digestive system stop working properly, several different diseases and conditions can occur. A couple of the most common are:

All of these conditions may have more specific treatments that help with specific symptoms. However, the food you eat also plays a big role in when and how often these symptoms come up. Eating some hard-to-digest or less nutritious foods can lead to frequent digestive issues. On the other hand, regularly eating nutrient-packed superfoods helps your gut work the way it’s supposed to.

Probiotics

Probiotic Food picture
You now know that healthy bacteria is one of the keys to a healthy gut. But where do these “good germs” come from? While babies pick up their first gut bacteria during or immediately after birth, adults can introduce more healthy bacteria into their systems using probiotics. Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that boost health. Eating foods that contain probiotics helps maintain a good balance of healthy bacteria in your system. These foods have been linked to a lower risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity. Probiotics may also help treat IBS symptoms, such as diarrhea.

What Foods Have Probiotics?

You can buy probiotics in supplement form, or you can get them from fermented superfoods. These include:

  • Cultured dairy products such as yogurt and kefir
  • Sourdough bread
  • Fermented cabbage like kimchi and sauerkraut (choose unpasteurized products in order to get probiotics)
  • Fermented soybean products like tempeh, miso, and natto
  • Kombucha (fermented tea)

Yogurt is one of the most widely available fermented superfoods. It is jam-packed with healthy bacteria. Choose yogurt brands that are labeled as having “live active cultures”. These cultures may include LactobacillusL. acidophilusL. bulgaricus, or S. thermophilus. Yogurt makes for a great breakfast or afternoon snack. It can also be used in a sauce or a dip as a substitute for mayonnaise or sour cream. In addition to eating probiotic foods, you can also eat prebiotic foods to support gut health. While probiotics contain actual live bacteria, prebiotic foods help feed those bacteria. They can also help the body absorb nutrients such as calcium, decrease the risk of allergies, and improve the immune system. Some items that help good bacteria grow are oats, barley, cereals, dairy products, asparagus, artichokes, onions, garlic, bananas, beans, and honey.

Fiber

healthy produce and fish
Fiber is material that can’t be digested by the body. While it might seem odd to eat something that your body can’t absorb, fiber serves other important purposes. Fiber allows the digestive system to soak up more nutrients, feeds gut bacteria, and helps prevent constipation. Fiber has other benefits, too – it can help the body control cholesterol and blood sugar levels and reduce a person’s risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease. There are two types of fiber, soluble and insoluble, and both are important for good health. Foods that come from plants that have a lot of fiber can also help build up a layer of mucus in the intestines. This is a good thing – it’s where the healthy bacteria live and work to digest food. Fibrous foods help build up this layer, while foods that are processed or have a lot of sugar wear down this layer. There is one caveat to eating a lot of fiber. Many high-fiber superfoods fall into a category called FODMAPs. FODMAPs are molecules found in certain fruits (apples, blackberries, cherries, dates, pears), certain vegetables (artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, garlic, mushrooms, onion, peas), dairy products, beans, wheat, and some types of sweeteners (honey, high fructose corn syrup, sorbitol). FODMAPs are perfectly fine for most people to eat. However, some people, such as those with IBS, may be more sensitive to these foods and should eat them in lower amounts. If you want to avoid these foods, try to find other ways to get a lot of fiber into your diet.

Fiber-Filled Foods

Whole grains have large quantities of both soluble and insoluble fiber, in addition to B vitamins, phytonutrients, and iron. Whole grains use the entire kernel of the grain. Refined grains are more processed, which removes a lot of the fiber as well as vitamins and minerals. To get more whole grains into your diet, substitute them for refined grains – for example, use brown rice instead of white rice, or wheat bread or pasta instead of the regular variety. Or try reaching for oatmeal for breakfast, or popcorn for a snack. You can also try cooking up some new grains as a side dish, such as quinoa, bulgur, or wheat berries. Nuts, seeds, and legumes also have high levels of fiber. Legumes include foods like beans, lentils, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, and are often thought of as superfoods because of all the health benefits they provide. Many legumes can be easily incorporated into side dishes. Nuts and seeds also make for great salad toppers, or a filling snack in between meals. Fresh produce also contains a lot of fiber. Some high-fiber fruit and vegetable superfoods include:

  • Berries: In addition to fiber, berries often have other health-boosting nutrients like vitamin C and antioxidants. They can be easily added to any meal. Try topping yogurt, cereal, or oatmeal with blueberries or strawberries. Or blend frozen berries with other superfoods like yogurt, almond milk, or coconut water to make an extra nutritious smoothie. Add them to other meals by throwing them on top of salads or into desserts.
  • Leafy greens: Superfoods like spinach, kale, and collard greens have a lot of vitamins A, C, E, and K, B vitamins, calcium, iron, and magnesium. Make up a salad with some greens, sauté them in olive oil, or toss some in a soup for an easy superfood boost.
  • Cruciferous vegetables: Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and bok choy are a part of the cruciferous vegetable family. Some leafy greens like kale also fall into this category. Cruciferous vegetables contain immune-boosting phytochemicals as well as vitamins like folate and vitamin K. Try steaming, roasting, or stir-frying cruciferous vegetables as a side dish.

Polyphenols

Many plant-based superfoods contain polyphenols, antioxidants that repair damage and heal cells. When we eat these molecules, the cells of our intestines can’t absorb them very well, so they start piling up in the large intestine, where our gut bacteria use them as food and break them down so that our bodies can benefit from them. Polyphenols can help the digestive system in several ways. They can:

  • Help keep bad bacteria from growing
  • Encourage good bacteria to grow
  • Help bacteria form a stronger barrier in order to protect the intestines from damage
  • Boost metabolism and help fight diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Improve the immune system
  • Protect against colon cancer

Coffee and tea both contain different types of polyphenols. Many fruits also contain these molecules, especially blueberries, kiwis, apples, and reddish-colored fruits like strawberries, raspberries, cherries, and blackberries. Other foods with polyphenols are onions, soy, red wine, and dark chocolate.

Conclusion

model of a body
The health of your gut plays a role in the health of other systems of the body. A digestive system that works well can help fight off germs and prevent diseases. One great way to stay healthy is to eat a variety of different superfoods, including probiotics and foods that contain fiber and polyphenols. Making these foods part of your regular meals can help treat digestive disorders such as IBS and prevent other chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and even cancer.

If you would like to discuss any digestive issues you may be experiencing with Dr. Connor, please make an appointment.

Superfoods Part 5: Ten Essential Superfoods for Radiant Skin

Superfoods Part 5: Ten Essential Superfoods for Radiant Skin

Young woman holding apple

This is the fifth article in my series on superfoods, with this one focussing on superfoods for healthy skin. I encourage you to visit the “Nutrition” section of Ask the Doctor for my other articles on superfoods.

You are what you eat. The foods that make up your diet can either supply your body with nutrients that help it work its best, or cause problems like damage and inflammation. You can help your skin become healthy, hydrated, and glowing by eating a lot of vitamin and antioxidant-packed superfoods.

Giving Your Skin Proper Building Blocks for Health

Why are certain foods better for your skin than others? While we may think of our skin as a single layer, it actually has seven layers and many different parts. In addition the skin is the largest organ in the body and is part of the integumentary system that also includes hair and nails.

Skin cells make up the outermost skin layer, called the epidermis. This layer protects the body, but is also most likely to be damaged by things like UV light from the sun.

Below the epidermis lies the dermis. This layer contains several things important for skin health, such as:

  • Sweat pores, which get rid of waste
  • Collagen and other proteins that give the skin structure and keep it firm but elastic
  • Immune cells, which fight off germs
  • Blood vessels that deliver nutrients and oxygen to the rest of the skin

Eating a balanced diet can help keep each of these components working properly.

1. Flax Seeds

Bowl of flaxseeds

Flax seeds are small brown or yellow seeds that are packed with nutrients. They are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which have many health benefits throughout the body. Research has found that omega-3 molecules can help the skin by:

In one study, people who ate more omega-3’s tended to have less skin aging associated with light damage. Other experiments have also found that omega-3’s can decrease skin irritation and redness and improve skin hydration and smoothness. Omega-3’s have other health benefits as well, such as boosted heart, brain, and eye health.

If you want to add flax seeds to your diet, try adding them to your breakfast by spooning a tablespoon on top of oatmeal or cereal. You can also add this superfood to yogurt or a smoothie, or bake them into breads, muffins, or even cookies! I often tell my patients to try them on salads as a crunchy topping as well. It is better to eat ground rather than whole flaxseeds, because your body can more easily digest and absorb nutrients from the ground form. Buy them pre-ground, or chop up whole seeds in a coffee grinder. You can also find omega-3s in seafood, plant oils such as canola oil, and in other nuts and seeds.

2. Salmon

Superfoods for Skin
Salmon is another excellent source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. It is also a good source of protein, as well as several other molecules that promote healthy skin.

Salmon contains a lot of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). This molecule is a damage-fighting antioxidant. The human body can produce its own CoQ10, but levels tend to decrease with age, stress, and certain diseases. Therefore, eating food-based sources of CoQ10 may help keep us healthy as we get older. This enzyme can lead to healthier skin by protecting against damage and helping skin cells make more energy. In one study, people who took a CoQ10 supplement for 12 weeks had more elastic, smooth skin and fewer wrinkles.

Salmon is also full of selenium, a mineral that neutralizes damage-causing free radicals. It can help skin cells heal DNA damage and leads to less damage following exposure to UV light. The combination of CoQ10 with selenium may protect against many signs of aging, leading to more vitality and health, a better quality of life, and improved physical activity.

As if all of this weren’t enough, salmon has still more skin-boosting compounds. This superfood has a lot of vitamin D, which may help protect against some skin diseases. It’s a , which promote skin health and wound healing. Another antioxidant, astaxanthin, can increase the amount of collagen in the skin, leading to fewer wrinkles and rough spots and better elasticity.

3. Yogurt

Bowl of Yogurt

As we’ve discussed before, yogurt is a great source of probiotics, or the “good” bacteria that inhabit the gut and help your body work better. When it comes to your skin, eating these healthy microbes can balance your skin’s pH and improve its ability to act as a protective barrier. By calming inflammation and reducing stress, probiotics can also help fight acne. It may also help with skin conditions such as rosacea and dermatitis.

Yogurt also contains other nutrients that support skin health, like vitamin A, vitamin D, and B vitamins. For better results, avoid flavored yogurts, which tend to contain high levels of inflammation-promoting sugar. On the other hand, if you’re not a yogurt fan or have dietary restrictions to eating yogurt but still want a probiotic boost, look to other cultured or fermented foods such as miso, komboucha, sauerkraut, or kimchi. You can also consider probiotic supplements.

4. Oranges

Sliced orange
The skin normally contains a lot of vitamin C. This nutrient acts as an antioxidant and helps the skin build up more collagen. It may also play an important role in healing wounds once the skin is damaged. As a result, vitamin C is often added to skin products like creams and serums. However, some evidence also shows that eating foods with vitamin C can lead to skin health. For example, researchers in one study collected diet information from 4000 women. They found that women who ate more vitamin C-containing foods often had fewer wrinkles and less skin dryness.

Vitamin C is found at high levels in oranges and orange juice. Be careful when going the juice route, however – many fruit juices contain high levels of sugar, which isn’t good for the skin. Other citrus fruits like grapefruits also have a lot of vitamin C, as do kiwis, bell peppers, strawberries, and broccoli.

5. Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Did you know that a food’s color can sometimes tell you what nutrients it contains? Many red, orange, and yellow fruits and vegetables get their color from carotenoids. These molecules are very important for heart and eye health, and also help the skin.

Tomatoes contain high levels of one important carotenoid called lycopene. Scientists have found that when people eat more lycopene, their skin is smoother and appears more youthful. Eating lycopene or tomato-based products can even help people get less sunburned. It’s also possible that lycopene may also help prevent skin cancer.

The body can more easily absorb lycopene when tomatoes are cooked, especially when they’re cooked in olive oil. Try eating roasted tomatoes as a side, or make a sauce to serve over whole-wheat pasta. Tomatoes can also give you a good helping of vitamins A and C.

6. Sweet Potatoes

Sliced Sweet Potatoes
There are other carotenoids besides just lycopene. Sweet potatoes are a great source of beta-carotene, a carotenoid that the body transforms into vitamin A. Like lycopene, beta-carotene can also protect against sun damage and sunburn. It can also help the body make more collagen, leading to fewer wrinkles.

Getting high doses of beta-carotene may actually lead to increased damage, so it may be better to get this nutrient from foods rather than from supplements. In addition to sweet potatoes, you can get beta-carotene from superfoods like carrots, squash, and leafy greens like kale.

7. Avocadoes

Avocado
Avocadoes are a superfood powerhouse full of nutrients that are good for the skin. They are sources of healthy fats, including omega-3’s and vitamins C and E.

Some fats are healthier than others. Avocadoes contain a lot of monounsaturated fats, which are the building blocks of many different types of cells, including your skin cells. These monounsaturated fats improve the elastic quality of skin and can lead to fewer wrinkles when eaten more frequently.

The carotenoid zeaxanthin can also be found in avocadoes. It protects the skin from damage-causing light. Clinical trials have also shown that eating zeaxanthin as a supplement can lead to fewer facial lines and wrinkles.

Avocadoes are also high in lutein, yet another type of carotenoid. Lutein can help prevent eye disease and improve memory and thinking ability. It can filter out damage-causing ultraviolet light, protecting the skin. When carotenoids are eaten at the same meal as healthy fats, they work even better because the body can absorb them more easily. Avocadoes provide the perfect combination of these fats and carotenoids.

8. Broccoli

Broccoli

Broccoli is loaded with nutrients. Eating this superfood will provide your skin with vitamins A and C, as well as multiple carotenoids like lutein and beta-carotene.

Eating your broccoli is also a good way to get vitamin K. This nutrient plays a big role in blood clotting, and can help the skin repair wounds and bruises.

Broccoli contains the mineral zinc. Because the body can’t store zinc, we need to make sure we’re getting it regularly through our diets. Zinc helps the skin by:

  • Allowing skin cells to divide to produce new cells
  • Strengthening the immune system
  • Healing cells from damage
  • Smoothing the skin
  • Helping heal wounds

Finally, broccoli has sulforaphane, a molecule also found in other cruciferous vegetables like cabbage and bok choy. Research into sulforaphane is in the early stages, but some experts believe that it can protect the skin from sun damage and keep the skin looking more youthful. Some studies also show that sulforaphane can help protect against several different kinds of cancer, including skin cancer.

9. Green Tea

Cup of Green Tea
Green tea is a superfood with many health benefits. This brew contains a mixture of polyphenols, compounds that act as antioxidants to neutralize free radicals within cells. Like some of the other superfoods on this list, green tea uses these antioxidants to protect the skin from UV damage. Typically, when the skin is exposed to UV light from sources like direct sunlight or tanning beds, skin cells will turn on biological pathways that create inflammation and encourage the development of tumors. Polyphenols in green tea can help turn down these processes.

In one study of 60 women, those who drank green tea had less redness after being exposed to UV light. These women also had better blood flow in the skin, meaning that their skin cells could get more oxygen, and had smoother, better hydrated skin. In mouse studies, green tea polyphenols can also help prevent skin cancer, although this effect hasn’t yet been well studied in humans.

You can also find some of these polyphenols in dark chocolate and red wine. However, eating too much sugar or drinking too much alcohol can also have negative effects on the skin, so these may not be the best sources for getting skin-boosting polyphenols on a regular basis. Replacing a cup of coffee or bottle of soda with green tea can help give your skin a healthy boost.

10. Turmeric

Turmeric spilling out of bowl

Turmeric is a spice that is a part of the ginger family. It is traditionally used in Indian, Southeast Asian, and Middle Eastern cuisines in curries and rice dishes. Turmeric contains the molecule curcumin, which has been studied in recent years for a large variety of health benefits.

Curcumin can turn on antioxidants within skin cells, helping them better respond to stress and damage. This helps cells resist stress and stay healthy. This molecule also helps cells build up new collagen, which is important for both wound healing and for keeping the skin firm and wrinkle-free. Finally, early research has found that curcumin can help reduce the symptoms of certain skin disorders, such as psoriasis and dermatitis.

Turmeric also contains another useful compound called silymarin. The milk thistle plant is the primary source of silymarin, but the molecule is also found in some other vegetables and spices. Silymarin plays a protective role in the skin and also helps prevent collagen from breaking down. The combination of silymarin and curcumin also helped block cancerous cells in laboratory experiments, but this has not yet been tested in humans.

Try adding turmeric to rice, quinoa, soups, stews, or curries. You can also blend turmeric into a smoothie or whisk into eggs for a superfoods breakfast.

Conclusion

Start early! If you’re younger, eating a healthy diet can help your skin continue to look radiant and healthy for the long term. If some signs of aging have already begun to appear on your face, there are still things you can do to slow or even reverse damage. Eating a variety of nutrient-packed superfoods on a regular basis can help build up the health of skin cells and the underlying dermal layer, and keep your skin looking and functioning at its best.

If you would like to discuss your skin, or treatments that we offer, such as microneedling with Skin Pen, please contact our office to make an appointment.

7 Health Habits Worse Than Fast Food (Eat This Not That! article)

7 Health Habits Worse Than Fast Food (Eat This Not That! article)

7 Health Habits Worse Than Fast Food (from Eat This, Not That!)

“There are a whole lot of other bad choices we’re making, and, over time, they are possibly doing a lot more damage than an occasional cheeseburger. Read on for 7 habits worse than fast food—and to ensure your health and the health of others.” Look for Dr. Connor quoted in the article!

To further discuss, make an appointment with Dr. Connor.

7 Health Habits Worse Than Fast Food

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